10TB hard drive

Handruin

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#4
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Makes me happy such that 8TB and 6TB PMR drives come down in price sooner...hopefully.
 

Mercutio

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#5
Did they ever address the issue with inconvenient screw placement on the Helium drives? IIRC there's no middle screw, which can make mounting the drives a PITA.
 

Buck

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#7
As a data recording technology for hard drives, PMR is already 10 years old. So far, SMR is not a suitable replacement for PMR; hopefully, HAMR will be. Interestingly, SMR seems like the true MR technology that begs to be a hybrid. Considering data is written in bands or blocks like an SSD (SMR also implements TRIM), I can see SMR hybrids producing the performance we expect from a HDD without the SMR write performance pitfall. With hard drive manufactures having better access to NAND flash (e.g. WD buying SanDisk), hopefully we'll see more hybrid implementations that give us better HDD performance (certainly it won't be SSD speeds) with the ever-increasing capacity we expect from spinning MR technology.
 

LunarMist

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#9
As a data recording technology for hard drives, PMR is already 10 years old. So far, SMR is not a suitable replacement for PMR; hopefully, HAMR will be. Interestingly, SMR seems like the true MR technology that begs to be a hybrid. Considering data is written in bands or blocks like an SSD (SMR also implements TRIM), I can see SMR hybrids producing the performance we expect from a HDD without the SMR write performance pitfall. With hard drive manufactures having better access to NAND flash (e.g. WD buying SanDisk), hopefully we'll see more hybrid implementations that give us better HDD performance (certainly it won't be SSD speeds) with the ever-increasing capacity we expect from spinning MR technology.
Meh. I tried that SMR and it is for the birds. SSD caching will not be any good except for the small area paralleled by the SSD. If you are copying say 8TB to a 10TB shingled drive, the increase in speed will only make it appear that the first part is going faster. The Apples have had the SSD caching for years.
 

Mercutio

Fatwah on Western Digital
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#10
SMR seems fine for its intended purpose. Even two or three 8TB drives are cheaper than an LTO changer and work really well for infrequently accessed, near-line storage. Don't use it for anything time-sensitive and it's pretty good.
 

LunarMist

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#11
The MTBF of the 8TB Seagate is rather low (800K). Are there any issues with reading only? I assume that would not affect the drive life much.
 

DrunkenBastard

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#14
Which Seagate 8TB? IIRC the Enterprise Capacity model is 2.5 million and 550 TB per year?

Edit to bump 1.2 to 2.5
So something interesting has happened, Seagate releasing Enterprise Capacity drives with the above specs but with 1 and 2 TB capacity, few platters and no helium. Depending on the pricing this could be the way to go for reliability without the premium pricing of the 8 and 10 TB models.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/01/17/seagates_fat_form_factor_throwback/
 
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