HOT

LunarMist

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The problem was that the heat index was 7°C/12.6°F higher than the actual temperature. When it is already 35°C all that humidity is just terrible.
I'll take the CA/AZ/UT/NV dry desert heat any day. You can lose a lot of water weight and dehydrate without feeling wet. Of course that can be dangerous too.
 

jtr1962

Storage? I am Storage!
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Flushing, New York
  • Mild = 38C, 100F.
  • Warm = 40C, 105F.
  • Kinda Hot = 43C, 110F.
  • Hot = 46C, 115F.
  • Really Hot = 49C, 120F.


So it looks like it might get Hot a day or two next week.
For me subtract about 40°F from those temperatures, more if I'm somewhat active. On the flip side, I cope well with cold. I'll be out shoveling snow with just a sweater in the middle of a 15°F blizzard.
 

sedrosken

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I can always put on more layers to cope with the cold, I can't so easily do the opposite to cope with overly hot days. That said, I have a very narrow range of temperatures I'm very comfortable in, ~30F to ~85F. And with my genetics and weight I start sweating bullets standing still at around 60F.
 

LunarMist

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I can always put on more layers to cope with the cold, I can't so easily do the opposite to cope with overly hot days. That said, I have a very narrow range of temperatures I'm very comfortable in, ~30F to ~85F. And with my genetics and weight I start sweating bullets standing still at around 60F.
You should be in great shape at that age. :) Heat, cold, etc. will be harder on you in years to come.
 

snowhiker

Wannabe Storage Freak
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For me subtract about 40°F from those temperatures, more if I'm somewhat active. On the flip side, I cope well with cold. I'll be out shoveling snow with just a sweater in the middle of a 15°F blizzard.
I used to love the cold. As evidenced by my username. But being clammy cold is what bothers me now. Dropping my weight from 205# down to 155# really reduced the amount of "in-body" insulation I have. Along with the fact that I sweat with almost any activity means I'm usually feeling cold/clammy, no matter what base/insulation/shell layering system I employ, when it's cold outside.

The severe heat only effects me about 4-6 weeks/year. I walk between 2 and 6 miles/day usually between 2-6am. But when it's pushing 85+F temps during the "coldest" part of the day I simply can't do it.
 

Tannin

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  • Mild = 38C, 100F.
  • Warm = 40C, 105F.
  • Kinda Hot = 43C, 110F.
  • Hot = 46C, 115F.
  • Really Hot = 49C, 120F.
Ouch! 46 is seriously hot. I've experienced 46 and 47 on only a handful of days. Some were in the Western Australian and South Australian outback, which is one thing. One was Black Saturday right here in Ballarat, which is generally cool by Australian standards, though can be hot in summer. That was one of the hottest two or three days ever recorded in Southern Australia, with high winds as well, and 173 people died in the fires across three states. Thankfully, the fires happened to be where we were not, but that was just a matter of luck.

What do I reckon is hot?

  • Mild = 15+ or 59F.
  • Warm = 25+ or 77F
  • Very warm = 30+ or 86F
  • Kinda Hot = 35+ or 95F
  • Hot = 38+ or 100F
  • Very hot = 42+ or 108F
  • Really hot = 45+ or 113F

Interesting that 38 degrees remains a psychological barrier. Presumably it is a hangover from half a century ago when people still used Fahrenheit and 100 was a nice round number. I wonder where the majority of people (i.e., those born after about 1965 or so) put their categories. Presumably they use 40 rather than 38, but I always reckon 40 (104F) is quite a lot hotter than 38 in a way that (say) 26 isn't all that much different to 24 or 28.
 

LunarMist

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Ouch! 46 is seriously hot. I've experienced 46 and 47 on only a handful of days. Some were in the Western Australian and South Australian outback, which is one thing. One was Black Saturday right here in Ballarat, which is generally cool by Australian standards, though can be hot in summer. That was one of the hottest two or three days ever recorded in Southern Australia, with high winds as well, and 173 people died in the fires across three states. Thankfully, the fires happened to be where we were not, but that was just a matter of luck.

What do I reckon is hot?

  • Mild = 15+ or 59F.
  • Warm = 25+ or 77F
  • Very warm = 30+ or 86F
  • Kinda Hot = 35+ or 95F
  • Hot = 38+ or 100F
  • Very hot = 42+ or 108F
  • Really hot = 45+ or 113F

Interesting that 38 degrees remains a psychological barrier. Presumably it is a hangover from half a century ago when people still used Fahrenheit and 100 was a nice round number. I wonder where the majority of people (i.e., those born after about 1965 or so) put their categories. Presumably they use 40 rather than 38, but I always reckon 40 (104F) is quite a lot hotter than 38 in a way that (say) 26 isn't all that much different to 24 or 28.
I received the metric system in the late 60s, but I'm sure you know the masses still use °F for weather in the US. In school and at work most everything has been metric, except pressure units such as PSI and Torr lingered on far too long.
Converting back and forth mentally during communication is a common requirement and PITA. When I was stationed in the EEC everything was metric, so it was easier. A few of the units were more challenging, such as m3/hr. vs. ft3/min.
 

Handruin

Administrator
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Ouch! 46 is seriously hot. I've experienced 46 and 47 on only a handful of days. Some were in the Western Australian and South Australian outback, which is one thing. One was Black Saturday right here in Ballarat, which is generally cool by Australian standards, though can be hot in summer. That was one of the hottest two or three days ever recorded in Southern Australia, with high winds as well, and 173 people died in the fires across three states. Thankfully, the fires happened to be where we were not, but that was just a matter of luck.

What do I reckon is hot?

  • Mild = 15+ or 59F.
  • Warm = 25+ or 77F
  • Very warm = 30+ or 86F
  • Kinda Hot = 35+ or 95F
  • Hot = 38+ or 100F
  • Very hot = 42+ or 108F
  • Really hot = 45+ or 113F

Interesting that 38 degrees remains a psychological barrier. Presumably it is a hangover from half a century ago when people still used Fahrenheit and 100 was a nice round number. I wonder where the majority of people (i.e., those born after about 1965 or so) put their categories. Presumably they use 40 rather than 38, but I always reckon 40 (104F) is quite a lot hotter than 38 in a way that (say) 26 isn't all that much different to 24 or 28.
In my region of the USA (New England), I would say that 38C/100F is still in that psychological barrier of being really hot. We seldom have days in the summer that make it to 38C/100F and the majority of people you would interact with will comment on how hot the days in the 36+/96F range.
 

LunarMist

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In my region of the USA (New England), I would say that 38C/100F is still in that psychological barrier of being really hot. We seldom have days in the summer that make it to 38C/100F and the majority of people you would interact with will comment on how hot the days in the 36+/96F range.
For me it's all about the humidity so I always check the dew point. Over 32°C/90°F on humid days can be very uncomfortable with only mild exertion.
 

snowhiker

Wannabe Storage Freak
Joined
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Messages
1,450
  • Mild = 38C, 100F.
  • Warm = 40C, 105F.
  • Kinda Hot = 43C, 110F.
  • Hot = 46C, 115F.
  • Really Hot = 49C, 120F.
I was being facetious of course. My list more accurately describes how people, who are used to the heat, in the Valley of the Sun (aka Phoenix, AZ, USA) describe summer heat. We hate it of course. But we are used to it. We just don't like to say, "It's HOT!" unless it's actually HOT! It's psychological.
 

Tannin

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Here in Oz, we aren't breaking any temperature records just now. It's mid-winter and generally mild. Without looking up averages, my impression is that it's a fairly normal winter - which probably means it's an unusually warm one: these old bones reckon an actual normal winter is very cold.

We are, however, well into a nasty drought, which is merely a dry year here in the south but severe anywhere north of the Murray. All the usual drought events are happening - you know the routine, cattle starving, farmers going broke, calls for government help. As an example, Broken Hill has had 18mm of rain this year, as against a long-term average rainfall year to date of 150mm. Now Broken Hill isn't farming country anyway, but a randomly chosen dryland farming district (I picked Dubbo as it was the first one I thought of) shows up as 74mm YTD where the average is 354mm. Tamworth much the same. You get the idea.

This summer coming up could be very nasty. We are well into an El Nino cycle, following on from a normal year, with a mild La Nina before that (if I remember correctly). Last summer we broke a number of all-time temperature records, which is something unheard of in a La Nina or normal sumer - it is the El Nino summers which throw up the really extreme heatwaves. But if the current El Nino lasts, as it appears likely to do, I daresay we will break another stack of all-time records and, with no water in the dams, it could get very nasty.
 

Tannin

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September is fine. Beautiful time of year. Often superb in the south (it is the spring), the last month for traveling in the centre (it can get very hot there from October on), getting warm but still fine and clear in the north - it gets horribly hot and steamy from about the end of October on. If you had to pick just one month for the whole of Australia (not too cold in the south, not too hot in the north) you'd go with September, April, or perhaps May. (The south doesn't generally get too hot before summer - December through March.)

Where are you going Lunar?
 

LunarMist

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September is fine. Beautiful time of year. Often superb in the south (it is the spring), the last month for traveling in the centre (it can get very hot there from October on), getting warm but still fine and clear in the north - it gets horribly hot and steamy from about the end of October on. If you had to pick just one month for the whole of Australia (not too cold in the south, not too hot in the north) you'd go with September, April, or perhaps May. (The south doesn't generally get too hot before summer - December through March.)

Where are you going Lunar?
No, I'm not allowed. It would be someone else.
 

jtr1962

Storage? I am Storage!
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Flushing, New York
Here is a fresh climate report from the US government.
https://nca2018.globalchange.gov

It's not a very comforting read, but at least it seems like they understand the problem now. That's a good start.
I'll summarize it in two words-we're f*cked.

I'm not seeing any scenario where we're avoiding a mass extinction event, or where human civilization as we know it continues much past the end of the 21st century. Any action we take now is like closing the barn door after the horses already left. My understanding is we can stop emitting carbon tomorrow but there's so much excess CO2 already in the atmosphere that disaster is inevitable. It's even less comforting that they're comparing possible temperature rises to the 1986 to 2015 period, which already had significant temperature rises compared to historical data.

It's at times like this that I wish there was a benevolent alien race who would come down from the skies and save us from ourselves.
 

Stereodude

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Some people will believe anything... The planet is cooling and has been for the past decade plus. They just can't stop fudging the data to hide it though.
 

Chewy509

Wotty wot wot.
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Gold Coast Hinterland, Australia
The planet is cooling and has been for the past decade plus.
OK, here is the data from the Australian BOM for:

Amberley RAAF airbase: 1941-Present...
http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/ncc/cdio/...e=dataFile&p_startYear=&p_c=&p_stn_num=040004

Logan City: 1993-Present
http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/ncc/cdio/...e=dataFile&p_startYear=&p_c=&p_stn_num=040854

Both these data sets indicate 1-2C rise (or at least show an upward trend) in last 20yrs.

Other datasets for SE QLD, Australia all show similar trends for the data the BOM is putting out? (They do have a aggregate data set for all of Australia, as well: http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/change/datasets/datasets.shtml )

So very interested in your source for your assertion that planet is cooling... Are they air-temp based? water-temp based? Do they include both carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide levels?
 
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