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Storage is cool
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How about using wool as insulation? Foam usually shrinks with time and loses the insulating effect.

By the way, we have had +10C here today, and it'll be between 8 and 11 tomorrow, not very hot... :(
 

DrunkenBastard

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EPS foam boards gives good insulation for a given thickness, however it has to be covered to mitigate fire risk.

Personally I'm considering Rockwool batts for my basement ceiling. Just friction fit betwen the joists. Maybe some EPS foam on the ground to cover the concrete slab (if I could go back I'd have the foam placed under the slab prior to pouring).
 

time

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By the way, we have had +10C here today, and it'll be between 8 and 11 tomorrow, not very hot... :(
Your Summer temperatures are pretty much Winter temperatures in Oz (in the cooler, temperate parts).

I live in a sub-tropical area, and at 9pm on a Winter's night, it's 11C. Right now I have bare knees and the house is not being heated (probably about 20C).

Interestingly, it doesn't seem to get anywhere near as cold as it used to 30 years ago. I don't expect the minimum this Winter to get below 4C, whereas we used to see <0C and frosts (record = -2.5C). From 1931 to 1960, the tenth percentile minimum was 1.7C, but from 1981-2010, it was 3.8C.
 

time

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Maybe some EPS foam on the ground to cover the concrete slab (if I could go back I'd have the foam placed under the slab prior to pouring).
Carpet with decent underlay is a tried and true insulator for concrete slabs. You could probably also get some benefit from 'floating flooring', which is timber veneer over a foam underlay. But tiles are absolutely out in your climate unless you enjoy frozen feet.
 

time

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You do not want to insulate the interior of the brick.
This is 'conventional wisdom', but like a lot of thermal building advice, I suspect it may be crap.

Castles, which have massive thermal inertia in their stone or concrete walls, have notoriously cold interiors that are very difficult to heat. On the other hand, cave homes at Coober Pedy stay relatively cool while temperatures outside hit 50C (122F). The suitability of heavyweight internal construction depends on the average temperature throughout the day.

Humans rely on heating the *air* in their homes, which is fairly easy. Heating the actual structure is close to impossible - if not insulated internally, it tends to act more often as a heat sink than as a useful radiator.
 
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Thermal mass and slower, more efficient methods of heating/cooling can be efficient if you design it from the ground up to be so, and if you want a target temperature the whole time. Unfortunately for me, I like the temperature inside to be cool when it is hot out and warm when it is cold out.
 

LunarMist

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Thermal mass and slower, more efficient methods of heating/cooling can be efficient if you design it from the ground up to be so, and if you want a target temperature the whole time. Unfortunately for me, I like the temperature inside to be cool when it is hot out and warm when it is cold out.
I'm not so thrilled with a constant temperature as it doesn't take into account the level of metabolic activity and humidity.
I also like airflow and opening the doors sometimes.
 

jtr1962

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Thermal mass and slower, more efficient methods of heating/cooling can be efficient if you design it from the ground up to be so, and if you want a target temperature the whole time. Unfortunately for me, I like the temperature inside to be cool when it is hot out and warm when it is cold out.
Same here. It hasn't been unheard of for me to keep my bedroom at 60°F or even lower during the summer and 75°F in the winter. To me it makes sense. My body is tired of hot or cold, and wants the exact opposite.

I'm not so thrilled with a constant temperature as it doesn't take into account the level of metabolic activity and humidity.
I also like airflow and opening the doors sometimes.
Yep. Mid 70s might be fine if you're sitting or sleeping but it's downright unpleasantly warm if you're doing anything physical.
 

jtr1962

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I think I would blow my brains out if I had to live somewhere that hot. As things stand now I'm finding the 4 months of hot weather in NYC more and more intolerable. Retirement in Alaska is starting to look good.
 

Howell

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For a multi wythe brick building in an environment that has a significant number of freezing days in a year you want EIFS. You do not want to insulate the interior of the brick.
The details of why and an entertaining read:
https://buildingscience.com/documents/insights/bsi-047-thick-as-brick

Note the warnings from the first article all through this article:
https://buildingscience.com/documen...on-masonry-walls-final-measure-guideline/view

2.2 Exterior Insulation of Mass Masonry Structures

Retrofitting existing buildings on the exterior (Figure 4 through Figure 7), is the best possible technical solution: exterior insulation provides the highest level of durability, energy efficiency, and comfort with the least technical risk. Specifically, externally-applied insulation and air/water control layers have the following advantages:

The insulation and air/water control layers can easily be made continuous and thus protect the existing structure (masonry) from rain, condensation, and temperature swings
Thermal bridging at floors and partitions is eliminated
Thermal mass benefits are enhanced
Access to conduct the work is often easier
 

LunarMist

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The details of why and an entertaining read:
https://buildingscience.com/documents/insights/bsi-047-thick-as-brick

Note the warnings from the first article all through this article:
https://buildingscience.com/documen...on-masonry-walls-final-measure-guideline/view

2.2 Exterior Insulation of Mass Masonry Structures

Retrofitting existing buildings on the exterior (Figure 4 through Figure 7), is the best possible technical solution: exterior insulation provides the highest level of durability, energy efficiency, and comfort with the least technical risk. Specifically, externally-applied insulation and air/water control layers have the following advantages:

The insulation and air/water control layers can easily be made continuous and thus protect the existing structure (masonry) from rain, condensation, and temperature swings
Thermal bridging at floors and partitions is eliminated
Thermal mass benefits are enhanced
Access to conduct the work is often easier
Maybe it is better to not have the brick construction. I know they don't hold up so well in the higher magnitude quakes.
 

jtr1962

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The details of why and an entertaining read:
https://buildingscience.com/documents/insights/bsi-047-thick-as-brick

Note the warnings from the first article all through this article:
https://buildingscience.com/documen...on-masonry-walls-final-measure-guideline/view

2.2 Exterior Insulation of Mass Masonry Structures

Retrofitting existing buildings on the exterior (Figure 4 through Figure 7), is the best possible technical solution: exterior insulation provides the highest level of durability, energy efficiency, and comfort with the least technical risk. Specifically, externally-applied insulation and air/water control layers have the following advantages:

The insulation and air/water control layers can easily be made continuous and thus protect the existing structure (masonry) from rain, condensation, and temperature swings
Thermal bridging at floors and partitions is eliminated
Thermal mass benefits are enhanced
Access to conduct the work is often easier
Interesting. For what it's worth my place isn't multi-wythe brick. It's wood frame with a one-layer brick veneer. And there's already some kind of crappy 1950's insulation between the brick and the wood framing. Pumping foam into the cavities between the framing seems like the easiest way to insulate and shouldn't have any of the downsides mentioned in those links.
 

Howell

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Pumping foam into the cavities between the framing seems like the easiest way to insulate and shouldn't have any of the downsides mentioned in those links.
It should actually be more of a concern. Since your brick layer is not as thick the external face is more likely to be kept above freezing by the internal heat in its current state. But even any problems would depend on the quality of your brick.

Multi wythe buildings are challenging because there are so many, so old with bricks of questionable quality.
 
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I'd take 8-11°C all year long. Not sure I can learn Swede language though. I'd like to visit your country someday.
You are welcome anytime. :) It's usually warmer in the summer, at least a few weeks with +16-22 where I live (not the warmest place in Sweden) and that's about perfect for me. But this is more like icelandic weather.
 

Stereodude

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Already +27C, 10 AM... I'm not used to this.
Do you have air conditioning that north?

I've been using my A/C a lot the past few weeks because it's been so warm during the day and not cool enough at night to cool off the house. Tonight should be cooler (finally).
 

fb

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"Hot" is +25C or more for me. :) I prefer temperatures between +15 and +22 in the summer. This year has been very warm and dry and this week has been "hot" with +30 a few days in a row.

We have A/C, but it's made and used for heating, and I haven't had to use it for cooling yet. But it's always nice to know that the possibility is there.
 

LunarMist

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I'm in a hotel with one of those power interlocks so AC is off all day. It's 32 inside and outside the heat index is 41C.
 
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