SSDs - State of the Product?

Handruin

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I may have answered the question incorrectly. For our enterprise SSDs we expect on worst case to hit 5 drive writes per day for what we do so we plan for that by using a drive rated for at least 5 WPD. This of course will depend on our customer's use-case but we have to plan for the higher end. In my specific project, we mirror two SSDs across two physical systems using DRBD and the device is used as a zfs SLOG device. The majority of our writes are synchronous which means the SSD gets used very frequently.
 

LunarMist

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No, there is no price yet. I think a local PCIe drive would be better since a rather high end NAS would be needed to match the STR and IOps.
 

LunarMist

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I may have answered the question incorrectly. For our enterprise SSDs we expect on worst case to hit 5 drive writes per day for what we do so we plan for that by using a drive rated for at least 5 WPD. This of course will depend on our customer's use-case but we have to plan for the higher end. In my specific project, we mirror two SSDs across two physical systems using DRBD and the device is used as a zfs SLOG device. The majority of our writes are synchronous which means the SSD gets used very frequently.
How many TB is that? I was thinking 8x4TB in RAID 5 would not see more than 1DRWD.
 

Handruin

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This would be 5WPD x 1.6TB (8TB) for our appliance. This is an enterprise backup appliance that supports hundreds of terabytes across many hosts.
 

LunarMist

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That's probably not the typical NAS use case. They mention Synology FS3017 which has 24 bays, so maybe they expect the load to be spread across a larger number of drives. Of course the FS3017 and 24x4TB for example would cost as much as some cars. Or maybe the Dudering will buy one. :D
 

Handruin

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That would be true that the load would be spread across all the drives assuming you built a NAS with all SSDs...however an all-SSD NAS is also not a typical NAS use case for most people.

With that kind of NAS configuration a more thorough discussion regarding the problem one is trying to address would be more beneficial. I would see limited value in using this as a file-based storage solution rather than build out a block-based scalable storage such as Gluster or Ceph with that amount of SSDs in play.
 

LunarMist

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The two use cases listed are all-flash NAS like the FS3017 and as caching SSDs such as found in many NAS (especially QNAP) nowadays.
I assume that Seagate is targeting a specific performance/durability/capacity compromise that fits those use cases and that their marketing believes there are enough users. If not they will be closed out at some point. :D
 

Handruin

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So, these Ironwolfs *might* be SOHO grade?

They are probably fine for SOHO or maybe even a small business. Like any good practice of data preservation one should always have good backups to protect of the inevitable drive failure.

The two use cases listed are all-flash NAS like the FS3017 and as caching SSDs such as found in many NAS (especially QNAP) nowadays.
I assume that Seagate is targeting a specific performance/durability/capacity compromise that fits those use cases and that their marketing believes there are enough users. If not they will be closed out at some point. :D
A caching SSD makes sense but the all-flash NAS seems like a weird fit for a NAS given the rather high cost of the drives. The Synology FS3017 looks to be a proper medium/large enterprise NAS offering that can handle this kind of IO along with the support for faster NICs like 25Gb and 40Gb with RDMA support and has dual Xeon CPUs. At a price of around $10,000 USD without the drives, I'd seriously need to look around at competitors before jumping into this unit. I would guess that this thing fully populated with SSDs would be around $30,000-$40,000 depending on the size and drive.

Given the investment, it might be worth considering an actual high performance storage array from the likes of Pure or Nimble and then put a NAS server in front of it.
 

LunarMist

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At a price of around $10,000 USD without the drives, I'd seriously need to look around at competitors before jumping into this unit. I would guess that this thing fully populated with SSDs would be around $30,000-$40,000 depending on the size and drive.
That's why I'm waiting for David to set one up. :LOL:
 

jtr1962

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