Remove Windows 7 SP1 backup files

Will Rickards

Storage Freak
Joined
Jan 23, 2002
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#1
From ddrueding (I put it here because I had a devil finding it with the search feature):

As an interesting aside to this, if you have installed 7 SP1 and are OK with making it permanent you can get some space back by clearing the uninstall files:

Press the "Windows" key, type "CMD"
Right-click on the "CMD" and choose "Run as Administrator"
In the Admin command line, type the following without quotes:
"dism /online /cleanup-image /spsuperseded"

This should take several minutes and clear 3-5GB.

I've tried it twice with success both times.

It works on server 2008 too.
 
Joined
Feb 4, 2002
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19,315
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Monterey, CA
#2
Just ran this on a 2008R2 install that had then had all updates applied (SP1 and SP2). Worked as advertised, with the install shrinking from 53.1GB to 45.9GB. Sweet.

Machine was a DC and DNS server and those services were unaffected.
 
Joined
Feb 4, 2002
Messages
19,315
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Monterey, CA
#7
Huh. Well, after install it prompted for some updates, then SP1, then more updates, then SP2, then more updates. Honestly I hadn't realized that SP2 was out for R2, but I just said yes. <shrug>
 

CougTek

Serial computer killer
Joined
Jan 21, 2002
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Québec, Québec
#8
If Windows Update asked to install the SP2, it's because you've installed Windows Server 2008, not Windows Server 2008 R2. If you tell me you've installed a SP2 for Windows Server 2008 R2, I want a printscreen for proof.
 

Handruin

Administrator
Joined
Jan 13, 2002
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#9
My Server 2008 R2 systems don't have any option to update to a service pack 2. They are at service pack 1.
 

Corvair

Learning Storage Performance
Joined
Jan 25, 2002
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Desolation Boulevard
#15
I thought Server 2008 = Vista and 2008 R2 = Win 7. I could be wrong, never Googled it.

You are correct, Cougie.

Latest (and likely final) Service Pack level for Vista and Windows Server 2008 is SP-2.

Latest Service Pack level for Windows-7 and Windows Server 2008 /R2 is SP-1.

Vista and Windows Server 2008 are also Windows NT 6.0. Windows-7 and Windows Server 2008 /R2 are also Windows NT 6.1.

As for the /R2 marketing silliness that has been used with Server 2003 and Server 2008, I often call these products Windows Server 2006 (released late 2005) and Windows Server 2010 (released mid-2009) just to make the distinction when it's necessary.

And for those of you that haven't worked with the most recent Windows Server products: Windows Server 2008 was the last version of Windows Server available as a 32-bit operating system. Windows Server 2008 /R2 is available as a 64-bit operating system ONLY. Just for that reason, the 32-bit editions of Windows Server 2008 will probably be sold for a while alongside equivalent Server 2008 /R2 editions (Standard, Enterprise, Datacenter, etc.).

Like Windows Server 2008 /R2, Windows-8 Server is a 64-bit-only product, and like the workstation editions of Windows-7, the workstation editions of Windows-8 will be available in 32-bit and 64-bit versions. If history repeats itself, a final service pack (SP-2) will likely be released for Windows-7 / Server 2008 /R2 several weeks after the release of all Windows-8-based products.



:brilsmurf: :brilsmurf: :brilsmurf: :brilsmurf: :brilsmurf:
brrrrr..... cold!

 

Mercutio

Fatwah on Western Digital
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
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20,329
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I am omnipresent
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s-laker.org
#16
Branchcache is the only new feature introduced in Server 2008R2 aside from the updated UI stuff that I can think of. All of Microsoft's training materials focus on the core Server 2008 product anyway so I tend to think of the extra stuff as optional. There might be some other things but they're going to be pretty obscure.

Branchcache is quite apropos for this discussion though.
 
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